Book Notes & Links

Part 1: SETUP AND QUICK START GUIDE

Chapter 5: Learning What’s Real (Two to Five)

Fathers and sons, mothers and daughters naturally seek each other, so spend as much one-to-one with your child, including interactive media time. For example, seek online sites that promote this process
(http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/03/fashion/03Online.html?_r=1&scp=55&sq=children%20technology&st=cse).

Socialization becomes more important to your child, and she has plenty of online opportunities
(http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/06/technology/06doll.html?_r=1&scp=80&sq=children%20technology&st=cse).

Superficial banter and small talk texting are common, as children as young as six learn the nuances of language and human social contact and are writing to each other more than ever
(http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/09/business/09cell.html?pagewanted=1&ei=5070&en=f07391b8da3489e7&ex=1205726400&emc=eta1).

To maintain a quick back-and-forth, they break a longer sentence into shorter fragments (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/07/technology/07online.html?_r=1&th&emc=th).

Informal usage is entering our lexicon rapidly and is already influencing the writing of English (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/04/25/education/25writing.html?ref=technology).

Researchers at Michigan State University have found that home Internet use appears to increase reading performance, especially in those lagging because of poverty and poor opportunities. Here are some resources: www.pbs.org search ready to learn and www.techandyoungchildren.org.

Start developing her interest in the rest of the world and travel (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/07/technology/07online.html?_r=1&th&emc=th).

The entertainment industry leverages one form of entertainment with others, crossing traditional lines and building fan loyalty by crossing into interactive technology (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/05/technology/personaltech/05games.html?_r=1).

Video game makers and retailers are striking deals to make branded merchandise an essential part of the players’ experience (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/29/business/media/29adco.html?_r=1&th&emc=th).

The insistent and urgent barrage of pleas and proposed deals coming from a child who craves the latest and best cell phone or other device can be a result of the intense pressure he himself is receiving from the media and his peer group
(http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/29/fashion/29cell.html?_r=1&scp=42&sq=children%20technology&st=cse and
http://pogue.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/06/12/how-to-block-cellphone-spam/?scp=48&sq=children%20technology&st=cse).

Huge sums pour into chat rooms and social network sites by merchandisers (http://www.techcrunch.com/2008/06/19/socialmedia-pays-out-8-million-to-facebook-app-developers).